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on counternarcotics efforts in afghanistan. after that, former pakistani president musharraf, then we're live with president obama as he addresses the national conference of the national council of la raza, and later the senate returns at 2 eastern for a period of general speeches follow bed later by debate and votes on judicial nominations. >>> also today on the c-span networks a discussion on the political transition in egypt. you'll hear from a member of the country's supreme council of the armed forces, the group that's been overseeing egypt's transition to democracy since the removal of former president hosni mubarak. he'll discuss the pace of change, the demands of protesters and the role of the military. the forum is hosted by the u.s. institute of peace. it's live at 12:15 eastern on our companion network, c-span3. >>> if you want to be informed about what is happening in the world and particularly in american politics and particularly in the congress, it's not so hard. c-span has a digital online archive that goes back to '79 or -- >> 1987. >> 1987. where you can, basically, watch an
.k. will withdraw 500 troops from afghanistan by the end of 2012. that is next on c-span2. .. 500 troops from afghanistan by the end of 2012, reducing troop levels to 9,000. he also took questions on counterterrorism efforts with pakistan. currently the u.k. is the second-largest of the foreign military force in afghanistan. from london, this is just under an hour. >> thank you, mr. speaker. with permission i would like to make a statement on afghanistan. formerly i said this government has sought to take a more hard hit security based approach to the mission.vernment as i've said, we are not there to build a perfect democracy, still a model society.re yes, we will help with the detablishment of demographicild institutions and yes, we can improve infrastructure, develop education, encourage democrac development, but we are in afghanistan. we can improve infrastructure, develop education and encourage development the we are in afghanistan for one overriding reason, to shore our own national security by helping the afghans take control of theirs. that means building up security forces to drive
to it and i'm so incredibly grateful. >> it's a story about afghanistan but it's about one woman and one family in afghanistan so it really personalizes some of the challenges of that country. it's called the dressmakers of speed and tells the story of >> guest: it tells the story of a young woman who is supposed to be a teacher and ended up becoming an entrepreneur because there were so tough on so many people and she was left as the head of a family with five brothers and sisters counting on her and she became an entrepreneur and a dressmakers because there was nothing else women were to able to do. >> host: the interesting thing is she had never sewn before and became a successful dressmaker. >> guest: in the course of spending years going back and forth in afghanistan writing the book which i really think celebrates the unsung heroines whose stories are never told during the war. what i learned is that she realized pretty quickly on that she was actually sort of lousy seamstress but she was a really good businesswoman, and the seamstresses kept coming to her house, the young and girl
in afghanistan and pakistan. not later than 120 days after enactment of this act, the entity described in subsection 8, shall submit to the president and the congress, a report. sense of congress, it is the sense of congress that the entity should be modeled on the iraq study group. section 8127, not more than $200 million may be expended -- the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise. mr. carter: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 31 printed in the congressional record offered by mr. carter of texas. strike lines 6 through 9 relating to military musical units. the chair: the gentleman from texas is recognized for five minutes. mr. carter: i rise to address an issue i think is very important to the patriotic men and women who fight and defend our country. representative mccollum, in good graces, asked that we restrict the military band funding by $120 million and in an attempt to help with the savings. but the congressional budget office has informed us that this reduction, this $120 million re
.s. military objectives in iraq and afghanistan with the center for strategic international studies and we will talk about the debt ceiling debate and the 2012 campaign with the former chairman of the democratic national committee, tim kaine and fox news andtucker carlson. "washington♪ host: today is wednesday, july 13. we begin by talking about the continuing negotiations regarding the gatt talks happening on capitol hill -- devt talks happening on capitol hill. we will have coverage of that on c-span.org. the first 45 minutes, we want to talk about some of the items in the headlines this morning. "l.a. times," debt talks grow more desperate. senators at merger -- urgent three stage process. it would have a last choice option. for the first 45 minutes, republicans only. we want to get your thoughts on republican leadership handling the debt talks. the numbers are on the screen. if you are in the eastern and central time zone for the first. the second if you are in the mountain and pacific time zones. for the first 45 minutes, just republicans talking about the republican congressional
on the defense spending going on for rebuilding in afghanistan. >> uh-huh. >> and there was five people on the program, and when they were asked direct and specific questions as to what's going on with the money over there, they were all saying they don't have those figures with them or possibly not qualified to answer them. and it's very insulting to sit there and listen to them, you know, telling lies to the american people. and on top of wasting that money over there, there again, wasting the money that taxpayers are paying politicians to sit and have to listen to these lies and they sweep stuff under the table. and saying we will get back to you when people are watching this program. they are not able to get the answers they are waiting to see and they never even hear the answers for six months or a year down the road. it will be a great way to start. it makes you wonder if they need to be on a lie detector sodium penathol lalan on our democrats line caller: good morning. >> you are on. go ahead. caller: okay. it amazes me how we can keep this issue about cutting spending, where i
the afghanistan campaign. and there we find another find of the coffee out. it turns out -- caveat. it turns out some allies simply do not wish to make more where there were no shooting battles. some did it one to fight unless they have helicopters there were all of these rules than pretty soon we started to see the folks who wanted to send soldiers out to the field to have almost insulting checklist so this starts to develop in buy the way i am very careful when a make a statement about the caveat because i don't mean in any way to cut down on the bravery of the troops who are helping us americans out there. and the germans are not very willing to fight because of a historical precedent. it is very difficult for the germans to get over second world war history. please don't and feud any other motive into that. so now you have a copy ought with afghanistan where we're not prepared to use the allies because it is a different kind of four in technology have left them behind and estonia started to do something the russians didn't like then there was a cyberattack that plan and the estonian governme
met more than a year ago in afghanistan in place that years of war had made unsafe for everyone, he signed up for duty that put him directly in harm's way. he talked to us about it at the time. american lal lor, one marine's story. >> reporter: we first meet joey jones in afghanistan. the financial base of the taliban. helmand is the deadliest province. do you feel like you're ready to retire? >> i'm jest getting started. >> reporter: and 23-year-old jones has one of the most tang rouse job, bomb disposal. >> it's a big deal for the country and the guys behind you. i saw an opportunity to do a little bit more. >> reporter: he's from dalton, georgia. a father of a 2-year-old boy. on this day, a tip comes in. jones and his team prepare for a tough day. >> bad day is coming out andnd doing our jobs and something going on. >> reporter: there are no big bomb suits. they prepare to detonate the ied. there's an achingly long silence, an then -- the blast rings in our ears. we walk to the crater. a local resident says there are three more this the area. >> get them out of here. >> reporter:
side the something was not right. something was not right. then let's move on to afghanistan. there came a time when it -- by the way, if you have not read about the account of what a few hundred special forces and armed cia people did in a few weeks in afghanistan after a sit-in for 11th, it is really worth reading. basically destroyed the camps, just a few hundred of them, including some wonderful cavalry horse charges. it's quite a story. but, in 2003 in the united nations says we need to know start stabilizing afghanistan. native took over the afghanistan campaign. and there we find yet another fault line developing. vendettas of fall line whose so-called caveat. some european allies simply did not wish to make war. it wanted areas where there were no shootings. others didn't want to fight at night. some didn't want to fight unless they have helicopters and so on. there were all these roles. we started to see folks who wanted to send soldiers out into the field consulting checklists to see what soldiers you could send out and what you could not. so this starts to develop.
, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan. panetta is meeting with american military leaders and afghan officials. nbc's atia abawi is in kabul this morning. bring us up to speed on what leon panetta is saying that al qaeda is basically on the run and close to being completely stamped out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. the new secretary of defense's first trip as the defense secretary here in afghanistan, prior to arriving he talked to reporters on the plane about how he feels alg al qaeda is going right now, the war against terror. he says the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach, primarily pointing the the death of bin laden, the information they got from the compound including names of different key al qaeda leaders. he says this is the time to actually end the war with al qaeda. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden, to put maximum pressure on them because i do believe that, if we continue this effort, that we can really cripple al qaeda. >> reporter: al qaeda aside, leon panetta arrived in afghanistan
old and treating american soldiers in afghanistan. mandy clark will have his story. >> this is the captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. nearly two months after her trial began the case of casey anthony is et is to be in the hands of the jury tomorrow. closing arguments took place today and anthony, a 25-year-old single mother accused of killing her two-year-old daughter three years ago could face the death penalty if convicted. cbs news "48 hours" mystery correspondent troy roberts has been covering the case and has the latest. >> reporter: for three years casey anthony has fought the notion that she killed her own child caylee. >> mama, papa. >> reporter: in 2008 caylee was a spirited two-year-old girl. then a missing person. and a murder victim. casey was her 22-year-old single mom who raised caylee with her grandparents cindy and george, all living together under one roof. but in june 2008 casey abruptly left home with caylee. the family did not see caylee for a month. >> i found out my gran
a week in afghanistan. among the expenditures, our payment for projects that are rebuilding infrastructure in afghanistan, roads, bridges, schools, in some cases hospitals. "the washington post" recently reported that the afghan government is taxing american aid. we send money there to build a road. we have to hire contractors in order to do that. and the afghan government is trying to tax that money for their own coffers. so it's not enough that our taxpayers are spending billions of dollars on projects to rebuild their infrastructure. the afghan government is literally trying to reach in the pocket and double dip and tax our taxpayers for our taxpayers' generosity in giving them money. . how does that make any sense at all? after this was reported, they are stepping up their efforts to grab that cash. they are doing things like threatening to detain contractors. if they don't pay up, take money that's assigned to build that road and put that money in the afghan covers, the afghan officials are threatening to detain our contractors. they are denying licenses to our contract
the civil war in afghanistan. i do not understand why members of congress want to spend $10 billion a month in afghanistan when our people back home are struggling. i can assure you the american people do not understand it, either. in june, a poll was conducted by the pew research center where 56% of the american people polled said bring our troops home now. not later. mr. speaker, i brought back the picture of edy and stephanie. their father and lieutenant colonel palmer, died, and that continues to haunt me. and the way they died continues to haunt me. that's the reason i wanted to bring this picture down here again. they were given the task to train afghans to be policemen. the two were shot and murdered by one of the trainees. what really haunts me is the email sergeant baldwin sent to his wife the day before he was shot and killed. i quote the email, i don't trust them. i don't trust them. for anything. not for anything at all. why in the world do we continue to send our young men and women overseas to get theirselves blown up, shot, and murdered by people they are trying to train? the
and afghanistan. and my belief that there is a smarter way to achieve our national security goals. and so, madam speaker, since that day i stood here in this spot to say over and over again that these wars are eroding our spiritual core. bankrupting us morally and fiscally. teaching our children that warfare is the new normal. i have delivered these speeches as a member of the majority and the minority when the president was a member of my party and when he was not, and today i am doing it for the 400th time. when i began the war in iraq was still quite popular. as was the president who launched it. but we spoke out anyway, refusing to bend on principle because we knew that we did not belong there. my colleagues, representative barbara lee and representative maxine waters and i, we called ourselves the triad, started the out of iraq caucus. we first -- forced the first house vote to bring our troops home. along the way i visited iraq, i tried and i learned on that trip and my opinion was confirmed against that very war, but at the same time it increased my admiration for our troops. gradually th
for something we want to show you, show you what some of our troops are going through in afghanistan. one of our correspondents embedded with the troops there, caught in the middle of a firefight. that is next. different jobs... ♪ ...different challenges. ♪ different opportunities. ♪ so why would universities stay the same? ♪ university of phoenix, because an educated world is a better world. universi♪ of phoenix, ♪ ♪ ♪ introducing purina one beyond a new food for your cat or dog. when someone changes lanes without warning? or when you're distracted? when you're falling asleep at the wheel? do you know how you'll react? lexus can now precisely test the most unpredictable variable in a car -- the driver. when you pursue perfection, you don't just engineer the world's most advanced driving simulator. you engineer amazing. ♪ >>> 16 minutes past the hour now. they are surrounded by enemy fighters, have to be on constant watch. troops at the u.s. outpost are there to battle taliban coming in from afghanistan. >> reporter: kunar in eastern afghanistan is some of the toughest terrain
rodriguez says he doesn't expect violence in afghanistan to start decreasing until next year. from the pentagon earlier today, this is 45 minutes. >> general rodriguez, it's counselor dave lapin at the pentagon. if you're ready to go, i'll introduce you and we'll get started. >> ok, dave, go ahead, thanks. >> thank you. good morning to those here, good evening in afghanistan. i'd like to welcome pack to the pentagon briefing room, army lieutenant general david rodriguez. he's commander of the international security assistance force joint command, also known as i.j.c. and also the deputy commander of the united states forces afghanistan. general rodriguez's current tour began in june, 2009, he became the first commander of the i.j.c. in october of that year. prior to that, general rodriguez was commander of regional command east for 15 months from january, 2007 to april, 2008. next week after two straight years in command and more than 40 months in after gap stan over the past 4 1/2 year, general rodriguez is ski wruled to change command and return stateside to have u.s. army forces
pakistan is critical to the success in afghanistan, as a supply route. things have been tense for a while. highlighted by the apparent lack of communication surrounding our raid that took out bin laden on their soil. today, white house chief of staff bill daley made clear that until we patch it up with pakistan, their wallets will be lighter. >> obviously, they have been an important ally in the fight on terrorism. they've been victim of enormous amount of terrorism. but right now, they have taken some steps that have given us reason to pause on some of the aid which we were giving to their military. >> reporter: using broader strokes, president obama said this week that we need to keep giving foreign countries aid so they don't become terrorist breeding grounds. he thinks it's worth it though we don't have dough to spare at home. >> it's smart for us to make a very modest invest in the foreign aid. it's a force multiplier and something that even in tough fiscal times, america needs to continue to do as part of our role as global leader. >> reporter: the money we withhold won't affect non
military engagements in iraq, afghanistan, and now libya. i speak of the need also of a new smart security to keep america safe. today will be my 399th speech. i look forward to reaching number 400 next week, and i will continue this until my last day as a member of congress, which gives me approximately 18 months, 1 1/2 years, time to bring our troops safely home. during this week, the week that the house is debating the appropriations, i thought it would be fitting to focus on more spending, on the staggering costs that taxpayers are being asked to bear for our military occupation. $10 billion a month is a lot of money, and that's the price tag for the privilege of continuing to wage a 10-year war against afghanistan. $10 billion a month. the american people who are writing that check have a right to ask and to get answers to some very important questions. where is that money going and what exactly is it accomplishing? what are we getting for our $10 billion a month? are we more secure here at home? is the afghanistan central government introducing the rule of law? have we not already de
and done, iraq and afghanistan will suck the treasury dry to the tune of at least $3.7 trillion. enough already. mr. chairman, the pentagon is like that teenager. you keep giving the kid the keys to the car and he keeps crashing it. it's time we cut him off. we must draw the line and we must draw it here. no more money for libya. no more continuance in libyan hostilities. i urge my colleagues, support this amendment. i yield back. the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise? >> i move to strike the last word. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. poe: the gentleman says we have gone to war in the name of humanity. in other words, the president's war in libya is so that we can preserve humanity in libya. in the history of peoples, as the gentleman from california has pointed out, in the histories of countries, it has always been the king, the dictator, the tyrant, the chief, the leader that has sent that particular country to war. so when our ancestors got together and they formed a new and perfect union, they decided it would not be the leader,
at the long-term health care needs of veterans returning from iraq and afghanistan. actuaries talk about the challenge in estimating the future cost of treating brain injuries and posttraumatic stress disorder. also, the wife of a wounded marine corporal talks about her difficulty in getting care for her husband. this is an hour and 40 minutes. >> good morning and welcome to today's hearing, where we are going to examine the lifetime cost of supporting our newest generation of veterans. as we all know, when our nation goes to work, it is not just the cost of fighting that war that must be accounted for. we must include the cost of caring for veterans and families long after the fighting is over and that is particularly true today, at a time when we have more than half a million iraq and afghanistan veterans amid the hope care system that is in over 100% increase since 2008. this presents a big challenge and one that we have no choice but to step up to meet if we are going to avoid many of the famous geeks we saw with the vietnam generation. but it is more than just the sheer number of ne
contract in afghanistan that moves more than 70% of the goods and materiel that u.s. troops need at their remote fire bases, moves it all across afghanistan. the military in kabul looked at this $2 billion plus contract and found payoffs and corruption. one u.s. official telling us, and we quote from what he explained to us, that when they looked at it there were concerns about, quote, fraudulent paperwork and behavior, indications dollars were flowing to criminals and the enemy. what we are talking about is a web of payoffs. the contractors who run the trucking companies, hire subcontractors, the subcontractors then pay or police and security officials who pay off the taliban or criminals so that their trucks get safe passage across insurgent zones in afghanistan. is it realistic at this point that any of this will ever change. we spoke to a top analyst about this. >> when you have the, you know, extent of corruption that we may have seen with some of these contracts, that's clearly not acceptable and they have to change the way they are doing business, but, you know, like i sai
troops home from afghanistan. i do that because i have the privilege to represent the third district of north carolina, the home of camp lejeune marine base, cherry point and seymour johnson air force base. i have been privileged since i didn't serve to have great relationships with active duty and retired marines in the district, and i want to share with this house, mr. speaker, that we continue to support a corrupt leader and a corrupt government. just recently, the half brother of mr. karzai, half brother named wali karzai, was murdered in afghanistan. this only reinforces the fact that afghanistan is in a fragile situation at every level of their government. it is in chaos, quite frankly. just this week i spoke with a marine colonel who's been to afghanistan three times. he was in my office on tuesday, and he shared the same sentiments as the retired marine general who has been advising me for 20 months, and recently i emailed the general and said, please give me your ideas of what mr. obama has proposed in bringing 10,000 of our troops out in july and then another 23,000 in -- n
be the most egregious example to date of widespread corruption in afghanistan. american taxpayer money, hundreds of millions of dollars, ending up in the hands of the taliban. a year-long u.s. military task force discovered that the money was siphoned from a $2 billion transportation contract to provide most of the supplies to american troops. a source with knowledge of the investigation has briefed cnn about how it all went down. we are joined now from the afghan capital, kabul. just tell us briefly, how did this happen? >> reporter: this is coming from an internal report, but basically what happened was trucking companies subcontracted out to local entities here, who then in turn subcontracted out to even more local providers. what happened was it turns out that some of those local, more local firms actually had some ties to nefarious elements, including the taliban. what we see here is a bulk of the transportation costs being filtered through some of these trucking companies and part of that money is actually ending up in the hands of the very individuals who are fighting nato force
and not put them on the backs of our seniors. the wars in iraq and afghanistan, the president has already begun a drawdown a it could be significant so we save in the long run. making certain that people are back to work so they are contributing to our tax base in a way that we need. and we know that we have to raise revenue. we must race revenue. our seniors understand that. but what we cannot do is shift the burden for these things that were not caused by seniors onto the backs of our seniors by pushing them into really unfair cuts to their medicare and social security benefits. . mr. tonko: i'm going to do a bit of close and then ask each of the representatives that remain here on the floor, we were joined earlier by representative chu from california, to offer your sentiments and then we'll bring the hour to a close. but you know, what i think is very important to note is that if we can find ways to save on medicare we should invest that in medicare to strengthen medicare. if we can find ways to save in social security, reinvest in social security. they deserve to be stand alones beca
panetta went to iraq and afghanistan. he did not go to pakistan. i take that as a strong message. it is easy when you're in that region to attack on an extra couple of days for an important ally. i think that cross the minds of everyone who planned the trip. it was clearly a conscious decision not to go to pakistan. i think that is in part because when osama bin laden was killed on may 2 there was a list of things that we would ask the pakistan's to do, the pakistani to do, and i have not acted on any of them. this administration also put a hold on a $10 million in assistance. a great way to resolve that is sending the defense secretary to talk to folks about what is going on, but he did not. you are seeing already how differently the pentagon will treat allies in the region. "the in this morning's financial times" they had this headline -- guest: the withdrawal deadline is aggressive. they're talking about getting half of the troops out during the prime fighting season. they do not fight as much during the wintertime. we are starting to withdraw troops during a tumultuous situat
. they are concentrated, concentrated in the area of american occupation, especially afghanistan, especially iraq, and increasingly the spillover of afghanistan into pakistan is causing huge number of attacks there. and so what's been occurring is not just a large number of suicide attacks, but a large number of anti-american inspired suicide attacks. >> besides the obvious policy of pulling out is there another policy? >> absolutely. because pulling out simply abandons our interest, ignores our interest. with this book suggest is a middleground policy called offshore balancing. offshore balancing continues to pursue our core security interests and obligations in overseas regions, but does so with over the horizon air power, naval power, intelligence assets, relies on economic assets and political tools. and this is the core policy that we pursue as the united states is for decades the major regions of the world such as the middle east with great success. and we should return to this policy. >> can you give a specific about how we pursue this policy in the middle east? >> in the 1970s and '80s th
the morning off. >> we've got a lot of news this morning, including some breaking news out of afghanistan. >> that's right. we begin there where afghan president hamid karzai's half brother was found shot to death at his home. ahmed wali karzai was the provenÇal council chief of kandahar. he suffered gunshot wounds to his head and chest according to hospital officials. a spokesman for kandahar's government said a guard killed karzai. the taliban says -- >> we've seen the worst so far. excessive heat warnings and advisories posted in 23 states. the heat in many areas could reach 115 degrees. the heat wave is being blamed for one death in madison county, illinois. in oklahoma it was so hot, that part of a highway buckled. look at that. motorist was hospitalized after his bike hit the buckled pavement. in arkansas several communities have opened cooling centers. good rule of thumb in tis heat whatever you're doing don't overdo it. >> if you're going to go outside in heat like this better be drinking a lot of water before you come out. make sure you have some substance in your stomach or you
now. everybody wants to talk about the wars in iraq and afghanistan. george afghanistan. george bush left office, he left a deficit of under $1 trillion. that is an obama stimulus package for one year and that was enough to hold us in iraq and afghanistan for seven years. host: let's go to a democratic caller in brooklyn, new york. caller in brooklyn, new york. caller: i think the numbers of the other caller are totally false. obama should keep his footing in this situation. the republicans say they will walk away and limit the amount of money but they will talk about that is on the table is preposterous. it is showing that they are scared and they are finally realizing that obama has an understanding of the economy and he has an understanding and backing of the people. right now is the time to change the way we need to move forward in terms of fiscal responsibility and in terms of paying our bills. with john boehner trying to figure out which way his caucus will both and which -- vote, he will lose his job and we will not be able to rectify the things that are wrong with the economy
in afghanistan and next director of the c.i.a. certains -- earns a salary of approximately $180,000. the secretary of defense earns about $200,000. how then can we justify salaries of up to $700,000 for defense contractor executives? i understand there may be contractors who supply services to our nation that our government cannot perform on its own. however, i am also absolutely certain there is no one single private contractor whos value to our national security is twice that of the commander in chief of the united states military. at a time when the chairman of the joint chiefs is telling us that the nation's deaf is the number one threat facing america, we cannot continue -- debt is the number one threat facing america, we cannot keep paying private contractor salaries that are more than triple the pay of our military leadership. my amendment simply states that funds in this bill will not be used to pay a federal government salary for any individual defense contractor that exceeds the valerie of the secretary of defense. that sal -- salary of the secretary of defense. that s
it comes to discussing the merits of continuing our efforts in afghanistan, the republicans clamor to defend it despite our fiscal mess. i want to remind my republican friends the situation we are in now is not new. throughout history from rome to the ottoman empire to the soviet union the over extension of military and protracted struggles in foreign countries has crippled empires. some historians have credited ronald reagan for the soviet union's collapse but what really bankrupted the soviet union was its wars, just like us, they paid a crushing price both financially and morally in afghanistan. overextending geopolitically comes at a cost over time in any nation that thinks otherwise is setting itself up to repeat the mistakes of the past. as of today, the united states has spent more than 2 1/2 times the percentage of g.d.p. on afghanistan that the -- than the soviet union spent on its g.d.p. during its nine-year war in afghanistan. public polls are clear, americans know the cost of the war in afghanistan is unsustainable and want us to withdraw as soon as possible. when it co
with the u.s. involvement in afghanistan and iraq. and as we'll hear from general d dudick, there's 400,000 in afghanistan. and the u.s.-led training effort is now as of this week 157,000 police, the cost of this training to the united states alone is about a billion dollars a month. today police assistance programs for the united states government are a multibillion dollar effort led by the department of defense and the department of state but involving a number of other federal agencies. as programs have grown in size and in costs they've also grown in kind. as you saw from the opening photo exhibition running here on the screens, policing around the world is heavily impacted by history, by culture, by legal systems, and by levels of development. the police force is different markedly by country, u.s. police assistance differs markedly by agent and by agency in the countries in which they are working. so today, we have assembled a panel of very distinguished experts to discuss the various experts that the united states government takes in approaching those countries. you have th
of the activists replain aboard the boat. >>> a deadly 48 hours from afghanistan. 30 afghans were killed in a number of attacks. the largest was in southern afghanistan. where a van struck a roadside bomb. 13 people, including four children and four women were killed in that attack alone. 65 international soldiers were killed in the month of june, including 46 americans. >>> from mexico, two brazen attacks in two days involving suspected drug cartel members. yesterday the mexico marines say a group of drug gang members attacked a convoy of marines and today in michaocan, investigators say 40 arm adsailianted armed grenades at a police station. three police officers were seriously injured and three gang members were killed. >>> in thailand, a bomb explodes. the expert siever survived the blast and was able to get up and walk away with only minor injuries. no group has claimed responsibility for the attack, but thai investigators suspect muslim militants. >> it's day 369 royal newlyweds north american tour, but not everyone is happy about their visit. more than two dozen canadians gathere
today. u.s. mission in afghanistan, three united states senators are in country and criticizing the president's plan for it. here's joel brown with the latest. >> reporter: key senators are raising doubts about the withdrawal plan. this may have undercut the momentum. i hope i'm wrong. >> reporter: they called the plan too risky. the plan, which the president unveiled calls for pulls out 10,000 troops by the end of this year and 23,000 gone by next summer. >> i hope it will work out. it's certainly depriving us that we needed for the second fighting season. >> reporter: the obama administration is standing by the plans. especially, the killing of osama bin laden have made it possible. al-queda is under more pressure than since any time sense 9/11. >> reporter: stilling the deadly raid shows insurgents aren't willing to go quietly. >> if we don't succeed, we'll be attacked again. >> reporter: while the debate continues, american troops are carrying on with their mission and preparing to hand security back to the afghan people. the draw down will begin this month. in washington, j
university professor. after this break, we will talk more politics and legislation and afghanistan with our roundtable, conn carroll and jamelle bouie. be right back. ♪ >> monday on c-span, the dali lama -- dalai lama and martin luther king, jr.'s speechwriter. they spoke about a number of topics, including the death penalty. >> the number of people who kill through violence -- are killed through violence, over 200 million. but problem not solved. i think that people lay down a seed of hatred. >> watch this discussion monday at 6:30 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> monday night on c-span, look back at president nixon's foreign policy. members of his administration and the president's son-in-law discuss topics including communism in china, invading north vietnam, and the 1967 war in the middle east. >> the discussion then in the newspapers were nixon's secret plan for peace. what was it? of course, he never talked about it. that was rockefeller pushing nixon to say something, to expose what his plan was. rockefeller did not think that nixon had a plan. he comes in after a hard day of campaigning
50 national guard troops returned to cedar rapids, iowa, after spending a year in afghanistan. about 2800 men and women will return home to the area in the next few days. this is the largest deployment that the state has seen since world war ii. and those are your headlines. >> let's talk about what's going on. couple of days ago, we heard the president of the united states say don't call my bluff, eric cantor and i'll take my case directly to the american people. today, the president is going to take his case to the american people. he has a press conference this morning at 11:00 a.m. >> we'll see what he says again. there's no talks today, folks. they've been doing them every day this week. there was a rumor maybe they'd go to camp david this weekend but not sure if that's going to happen. no talks today. >> fascinating to see after an hour and 19 minutes yesterday that eric cantor did not say a word today, yesterday, and on thursday. now the president for the second time this week will have his press conference at which time he's going to do something. i think it's his third one
away from capitol hill, the economy and debt crisis are weighing heavily on u.s. troops in afghanistan. the top question on their minds saturday, even as bombings rocked the city around them, was the top u.s. military officer couldn't answer. will we get paid? these are soldiers in afghanistan with the bombs bursting around them. here's what the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said, and i quote, "i honestly don't know the answer to that question." admiral mike mcmullin responded, statement telling them to work each day to defend this country. wearing the uniform, listening to bombs go off around them. that is why today what is referred to in the press as real people. i guess we're not. we have students like laura and sidney. we have veterans like bill and roger and carlos and ariana who is a senior. guerm who is a senior. felicia is a senior. alyssa is a senior. they are here representing the millions of people around this country who are as frayed of the soldiers on the frontline in afghanistan. we don't have more delaying tactics? we need to get to the business of hand. we have
recipient to make it out of afghanistan alive. the army ranger took a bullet through both legs during a firefight. he still managed to fling an enemy grenade away from two other rangers -- from the other rangers. the grenade exploded taking off petri's right hand. >>> well, it is the scandal rocking one of the most powerful media empires in the world and it is getting bigger and even uglier today. two more of rupert murdoch's newspapers in great britain are being called out for allegedly breemping the privacy of everyone, from the former prime minister to the queen of england. murdoch himself along with his son and one of his top editors are being called by the british government to explain themselves. dan rivers, she in london. and, dan, tell us about this. it seems to go all the way at the top of newscorp. i understand we just lost dan. we're going it try to get back to dan as quickly as we can to bring you the very latest. i understand now we have dan. dan, can you hear me? dan? can you hear me? >> reporter: yes, i can hear you fine. >> dan, tell us about how high up this goes? we
their phone hacked into, be it terrorist attacks, in 2005 or the families of fallen soldiers in afghanistan, celebrities, royal family, murder victims, the list just goes on and on, it's and just kind of breathtaking some of the things that are alleged to have gone on. >> dan rivers for us today in london. appreciate you as always, thanks so much. >>> the royal newlyweds are wrapping up their trip through canada. next stop, the u.s. introducing the schwab mobile app. it's schwab at your fingertips wherever, whenever you want. one log in lets you monitor all of your balances and transfer between accounts, so your money can move as fast as you do. check out your portfolio, track the market with live updates. and execute trades anywhere and anytime the inspiration hits you. even deposit checks right from your phone. just take a picture, hit deposit and you're done. open an account today and put schwab mobile to work for you. >>> prince william and list new bride are wrapping up the ka that ian tour with a stop in calgary. they helped kick off the calgary stampede parade, one of the largest in
number of social political issues -- i mean geopolitical issues, what is happening in afghanistan and iraq, what is happening with education in this country. his analysis -- the death of his insight and analysis i think is just undeniable -- the debt -- the depth of his insight and analysis is just undeniable. it is a reflection of how comfortable and distracted many of us our -- us are that we have not created a more sustained movement around cases like this. i voted for barack obama. i would vote for him again when the time comes. at the same time, i get asked this question so often, right? are we post-race? are we past racism because there is a black man in the white house? the question is, i mean, was england post-gender with margaret thatcher? indira gandhi, was in the a post-gender when bolivia elected its first working class president, where the post-class? i mean, it is a reflection of the dichotomy. the movement -- you cannot deny the accomplishments of the movement. the human rights movement, which we need to begin talking about more, and malcolm x began to increasingly
these funds available through a transfer from the account for the afghanistan security forces fund. that account is funded in this bill at $12.8 billion. while i think those funds are an important part of the strategy for long-term success in afghanistan, i think the highest and best use of a very small part of that money is to help our national guard and reserve combat veterans get back on their feet again. my amendment would use about 1.5% for that purpose, which i think is reasonable. in exchange for about 1.5% of what we are about to provide to help the afghans take care of themselves we can provide a 125% increase in support for those american soldiers and their families who make it all possible. i think that's a pretty good deal. finally, my amendment will not in any way delay final passage of this important passage. if adopted we move to a straight final vote on passage of this legislation. i want to thank the chairman and the ranking member for their service and for their work on this bill. i think my amendment will have virtually no adverse impact on what we're trying to d
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